Monday, May 4, 2015

From the “It’s always something” department

We’ve had spectacular weather here the past few days (we earned it!) and yesterday I put down the yard work tools to go for a ride. Not a long ride but I needed a few things at Canadian Tire and a stop at Tim Hortons on the way home was also factored in.

To get a few extra riding miles in I headed up the valley to Renfrew instead of going to my local outlet. Besides the Renfrew Can Tire is a much larger store and offers more opportunities to buy stuff I don’t really need but which is too good a deal to pass up.

I got what I needed (and a little more besides) and headed over to Timmies where I enjoyed my Iced Capp and watched the bikes roll by on O’Brien Street.



But then, as I’m riding home, a dreaded red light comes on on the dash. IMG_20150503_160328046The bike’s still running strong but I also notice my signal lights aren’t working.

That’s not good, but at least no other indicators are lit that would indicate an oil pressure problem or anything like that. So it’s hand signals and I press on home, concerned about the reason the warning light’s on. It’s when I pull into the garage that I also notice I have no headlight and no taillights. Really not good.
I checked the fuses and found there’s one burnt. Ah-ha! Replaced it only to have the second one blow as soon as I turned on the ignition.

So I’ve got a short - somewhere. A wire has pulled out of a connector, or the insulation is worn through and making an unexpected connection. After a couple of hours I am still no further ahead. The bike is somewhat dismantled (most of the wiring harness is under the tank and really easy to get at – NOT!) and I’ve blown all the spare fuses I had.

IMG_20150504_162409460

So I’m done for today. Tomorrow I’ll pick up some more fuses, or a circuit breaker if I can find one, and go at it again.  That’s what I hate about electrical issues – either you find it right away (which I didn’t), or you’re in for a long, hard slog with a multimeter and continuity tester until you track it down. Wish me luck!

9 comments:

  1. I would use a test light in place of the fuse and then start moving the harness around. When there is a short, the light will be bright and get dimmer when the short is removed. Dim as there may be other paths to ground such as through a bulb or some other normal circuit.

    Easier than replacing fuses.

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    1. Good suggestion Richard. I'll give that a try.

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  2. Frustrating. I am sure you'll figure it out eventually. At least you were able to get home.

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    1. Gary - Yeah, that's the good news.

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  3. Well, at least you managed a nice ride in the sunshine before the electrical gremlins hit.

    Hope the diagnosing is quick.

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    1. Trobairitz - I think I found the problem today when the equalizer for the led lights started smoking. :) Pulled it out of the system and so far, so good.

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  4. I'm not familiar with an equalizer related to lights. Was that the answer?

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    1. Usually 25 watt, 6 ohm resister to simulate the load of a bulb so that flashers work properly. They get pretty warm but only when the blinkers are running.

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    2. Coop - Seems to be. Been running for a couple of day snow with no equalizer and all seems fine. Fortunately the company has a lifetime warranty, so a new unit should soon be on its way.

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