Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Any job worth doing is worth doing twice.

We just recently purchased a new vehicle, and with that vehicle came four new snow tires, already mounted on wheels to make the seasonal changeover a bit easier.

Today we had a rather balmy day for November and so I took the opportunity to put the snows on. (For those of you south of about the 45th parallel, ‘putting the snows on’ is a seasonal celebration that officially marks the change of season from mosquito-infested to ice-encrusted – and vice versa in the spring.)

RotateEverything was going well until I was bolting on the last wheel when I noticed some fine print on  the tire which said, Rotation, with an arrow pointing the wrong way. “Crap”, I said. Well, maybe not exactly “crap” but a similar sentiment was expressed. And sure enough, when I checked,  every.single.wheel was wrong. Left wheels were on the right and right wheels on the left. I had installed four wheels randomly and got all four wrong. No wonder I never win the lottery.

In my defense I don’t, in all the years of swapping summer and snow tires, ever remember coming across directional tires for a car. Motorcycle, sure, that’s normal, but not a car. I expect the worst that would happen is that they may not be quite as effective in the snow, but I changed them all again and now the arrows are all pointing in the right direction (forward).

And as I sit here with a cold beer as my reward, I am thinking it’s a good thing that I won’t have to spend the winter driving in reverse.

10 comments:

  1. I only remember rotation to be important for two-wheelers, David. Anyway, we would never consider changing tires at home. It cost a mere 15€ at the local tire service down the road, they have all the tools, store the tires, and it's been done within 20 minutes by appointment. Nah, why bother ;-)

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    1. Sonja - It's a little more expensive here but it's the time mostly. By the time I load the tires in the car, drive to town, have them changed,and drive back, it's the better part of 2 hours. Even doing it twice was less than an hour at home - and I have the tools.

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  2. That is a new one on me also. I have never had to deal with snow tires but never hear of directional car tires. I can; however, see myself doing the same thing.

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  3. No snow tires in NZ, BUT... if you are crossing various of the South Island passes in the winter here, you are REQUIRED to be carrying tire CHAINS(!) in your car, or it is a traffic offence. It is quite hilarious to watch news clips of people who have NO IDEA AT ALL trying to install the chains when the snow arrives. Those with any sense at all simply turn around and go back the way they came. :-D

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  4. Doh! Good thing you changed them around. I wonder if it is because of the tread of snow tires that they are starting to put directional arrows on them?

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    1. Brandy - No directional arrows on my summer tires, so I expect that's the reason.

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  5. Well, all's well. Can't drive the car in reverse until April, but it's a small price to pay for decent traction.

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    Replies
    1. David - Living where we do good winter tires are a necessity.

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